New lawn sprinkling regulations come into effect in Metro Vancouver on Sunday as water use ramps up.
— The Vancouver Sun

Across North America, city governments and neighbourhood activists are worried that the exploding popularly of Airbnb is hurting neighbourhoods and putting a strain on rental housing stock, as landlords choose the lucrative option of short-term rentals over long-term tenants.

Results from Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp.'s first-ever rental turnover survey in Metro Vancouver points to a migration of rental demand from the pricier centre to less-expensive suburbs.

Burnaby is putting up a forest of high-rise residential towers up to 65 storeys tall over the next 25 years, far outstripping anything Vancouver is contemplating.

Canada’s housing agency, looking for new methods to track foreign ownership in the country’s soaring real estate markets, may tap money laundering police and classify international university students as foreign buyers, according to internal documents.

Millionaire homeowners cashing out of Metro Vancouver’s red-hot real estate market are seeking greener pastures elsewhere in B.C. Real-estate experts say they’re seeing more city slickers selling off their urban homes and heading north or east to buy hobby farms and acreages, where they can live off the land with cash to spare.

A weak currency and slumping global commodity prices are indirectly contributing to a rush on Lower Mainland real estate. The two forces are aggravating a pre-existing situation of too many buyers and renters chasing too few housing units.

The Real Estate Council of B.C. and the B.C. Financial Institutions Commission have appointed a powerful advisory committee to look into allegations of real estate licensee misconduct. Drawing deeply on the leaders of the B.C. Securities Commission, Central 1 Credit Union, Society of Notaries Public and others, the advisory committee has set a deadline of mid-April for an interim report and the end of May for a final report with recommendations. Carolyn Rogers, the Superintendent of Real Estate and the CEO of the Financial Institutions Commission, was appointed last week by the Real Estate Council of B.C. to look into allegations of “shadow flipping,” in which some real estate agents are using a little-known “assignment contract” to secretly flip properties for higher prices without the knowledge of their listing clients.

A massive infusion of offshore cash into the Lower Mainland’s multi-family residential property market is “disrupting the local development and investor communities,” resulting in bidding wars and a surge in the value of real estate sales. A report by well-known apartment property analysts David Goodman and his son Mark also notes the region’s vacancy rates continue to drop and tenants in some parts of the region are being hit with rent hikes of more than five per cent.

The B.C. government is examining a proposal for an “affordable housing fund” generated by a tax targeted at non-resident investors and speculators, Premier Christy Clark said Tuesday. The concept by a group of university business school academics could help loosen the tight rental market by encouraging owners of vacant homes to rent them out, Clark told reporters at a tech conference in Vancouver.